Recent Changes

Tuesday, October 24

  1. page tap-in prototype edited ... tap-in prototype (with no-dial phone and rfid) Some lessons learned: ... frequencies: 13mh…
    ...
    tap-in prototype (with no-dial phone and rfid)
    Some lessons learned:
    ...
    frequencies: 13mhz andis what we use.
    Want to match a particular transit system card? see this wikipedia page on Mifare cards (e.g., Washington DC uses "MIFARE Plus X")
    Since there were so many standards, I also just looked to make sure the card could match the standard of my reader ("ISO14443A"). The ones that worked were listed as "50pcs RFID Proximity Control Entry Access 13.56Mhz ISO14443A MF S50 ISO IC Card" on ebay ($18.95 with free shipping, per July 2016)
    (view changes)

Tuesday, March 21

  1. page Payphone culture edited The Phonebooth:http://thephonebooth.com/ ... System and it's its companies -- Payphones of…

    The Phonebooth:http://thephonebooth.com/
    ...
    System and it'sits companies --
    Payphones of the World (2600): http://www.2600.com/phones/
    the back page of 2600 magazine hosted pics of "payphones of the world." Instructions for readers: send in your pictures. "the payphone is the subject." now they are up and searchable on the web...
    (view changes)

Wednesday, July 27

  1. page tap-in prototype edited ... make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/…
    ...
    make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/metro cards and student id cards for door access. (specifically a Mifare IC card reader 13.56 mhz, see amazon link.) It seems that there are primarily two frequencies: 13mhz and
    Want to match a particular transit system card? see this wikipedia page on Mifare cards (e.g., Washington DC uses "MIFARE Plus X")
    ...
    my reader ("ISO14443A")("ISO14443A"). The ones that worked were listed as "50pcs RFID Proximity Control Entry Access 13.56Mhz ISO14443A MF S50 ISO IC Card" on ebay ($18.95 with free shipping, per July 2016)
    {tap-phone1.jpg} no-dial red phone (can fit an RFID reader underneath)
    (view changes)
    9:41 am

Wednesday, July 20

  1. page tap-in prototype edited ... make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/…
    ...
    make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/metro cards and student id cards for door access. (specifically a Mifare IC card reader 13.56 mhz, see amazon link.) It seems that there are primarily two frequencies: 13mhz and
    Want to match a particular transit system card? see this wikipedia page on Mifare cards (e.g., Washington DC uses "MIFARE Plus X")
    Since there were so many standards, I also just looked to make sure the card could match the standard of my reader ("ISO14443A")
    {tap-phone1.jpg} no-dial red phone (can fit an RFID reader underneath)
    (view changes)
    1:55 pm
  2. page tap-in prototype edited ... Some lessons learned: make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reade…
    ...
    Some lessons learned:
    make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/metro cards and student id cards for door access. (specifically a Mifare IC card reader 13.56 mhz, see amazon link.) It seems that there are primarily two frequencies: 13mhz and
    Want to match a particular transit system card? see this wikipedia page on Mifare cards (e.g., Washington DC uses "MIFARE Plus X")
    {tap-phone1.jpg} no-dial red phone (can fit an RFID reader underneath)
    (view changes)
    1:39 pm
  3. page tap-in prototype edited tap-in prototype (with no-dial phone and rfid) Some lessons learned: make sure you buy blank c…

    tap-in prototype (with no-dial phone and rfid)
    Some lessons learned:
    make sure you buy blank cards that match your reader. we picked a reader that worked with bus/metro cards and student id cards for door access. (specifically a Mifare IC card reader 13.56 mhz, see amazon link.) It seems that there are primarily two frequencies: 13mhz and
    {tap-phone1.jpg} no-dial red phone (can fit an RFID reader underneath)

    (view changes)
    1:33 pm
  4. file tap-phone1.jpg uploaded
    1:25 pm
  5. page home edited ... Case study: our physical prototype for Sankofa Red (public stub only) wiring the PiPhone hard…
    ...
    Case study: our physical prototype for Sankofa Red (public stub only)
    wiring the PiPhone hardware with Raspberry Pi including our custom board (see also earlier R Pi hacking -- networking, playing videos, hooking up to phone hardware)
    tap-in prototype with no-dial phone and rfid
    software PiPhone tips -- e.g., connecting **wirelessly** to the Pi (useful to update software without needing to open the payphone)
    printable inserts and visual customization -- mostly with paper
    (view changes)
    1:20 pm

Tuesday, June 14

  1. page PiPhone-Setup edited ... 3 is being misread as 1, 6 as 4 9 as 7. according to the binary in our PY file, that means: 3…
    ...
    3 is being misread as 1, 6 as 4 9 as 7.
    according to the binary in our PY file, that means: 3=0100 while 1=0000 (not detecting second digit); 6=0110 while 4=0010 (not detecting second digit); and 9=0101 while 7=0001 (not detecting second digit)...
    ...
    pin 39. see diagram.
    so we should NOT detect 16-to-39 when pushing these buttons... but for instance, we should detect on the 4 key that the third number (GPIO24=pin18) does work.
    ...but i can't figure out how to test this.... YET
    precursor: see if new keypad works... should be easier to test. if not, get right cables!

    (view changes)
    4:13 pm
  2. page PiPhone-Setup edited ... 3 is being misread as 1, 6 as 4 9 as 7. according to the binary in our PY file, that means: 3…
    ...
    3 is being misread as 1, 6 as 4 9 as 7.
    according to the binary in our PY file, that means: 3=0100 while 1=0000 (not detecting second digit); 6=0110 while 4=0010 (not detecting second digit); and 9=0101 while 7=0001 (not detecting second digit)...
    ...
    GPIO #23. For the Raspberry Pi+, that = pin 16. ground is pin 39.
    so we should NOT detect 16-to-39 when pushing these buttons... but for instance, we should detect on the 4 key that the third number (GPIO24=pin18) does work.

    (view changes)
    3:59 pm

More